Looking for ways to enhance your Stinger and set it apart from others on the road? Look no further than KDM Warehouse!

Cold Air Intake -- Worth it?

GotStinger?

Member
33
23
8
The main limiter on the stock intake setup is the baffles/boxes *in front of* the core support. Remove those, add a snorkel if you want, and you're 90% of the way there. An aftermarket intake gives you the PSSSST and a bit more power.
Those forward air boxes are there to muffle noise, but they also seriously restrict airflow.
I guess I am part of the 'boring' crowd of Stinger owners now b/c I do not like the PSSSST sound. LOL ...
 

StingerMG

Active Member
300
173
43
South Carolina
We go to great lengthes for cooler air just to have a pair of spiny bois heat it up. Since the intake air temperature sensor is located on the cold side charge pipe, it's technically reading the temperature of the charge air leaving the intercooler.
______________________________
 

bfglitch

Stinger Enthusiast
False. The definition of a cold air intake hasn't changed in over 40 years. The filter element MUST be external to the engine bay and in direct line of incoming ambient air.
Is there an official definition that you're referencing? I only ask because I've heard so many different arguments about what a cold air intake REALLY is and they always end with people eventually walking away not really knowing.
 

stoopid

1000 Posts Club!
1,731
1,428
118
Las Vegas, NV
Is there an official definition that you're referencing? I only ask because I've heard so many different arguments about what a cold air intake REALLY is and they always end with people eventually walking away not really knowing.
Stiletto's definition is correct but maybe a bit too strict. I think any configuration that allows air from outside the engine bay a direct path to the air filter/intake without any warmer engine bay air mixing in can be sufficiently considered a 'cold' air intake as well. It's preferable to have as much of the intake hardware outside the engine bay as possible, but in most vehicle this is not logistically / cosmetically practical. IMO anything that allows cold air into the engine without the engine air being allowed into that intake is CAI. Most people are using cone shaped "performance air intakes", not COLD air intakes, since the entire intake sites in the engine bay and is sending warm air into the engine (versus cooler air direct from outside the engine bay). But they commonly call all intakes "cold" air. It's a misnomer.
 
Last edited:
The best place to buy Kia Stinger modifications is at KDM Warehouse dot com! The official store of Kia Stinger dot com...

Stiletto

Sustaining Member +
292
214
43
Virginia Beach, VA
We go to great lengthes for cooler air just to have a pair of spiny bois heat it up. Since the intake air temperature sensor is located on the cold side charge pipe, it's technically reading the temperature of the charge air leaving the intercooler.
While you're not wrong, bringing in cooler air will still be better than hotter, even though it goes through the snails. Basic science can't be defeated by Kia turbos.
Is there an official definition that you're referencing? I only ask because I've heard so many different arguments about what a cold air intake REALLY is and they always end with people eventually walking away not really knowing.
CAI: For overall performance, this is the best option when the engine is revved to higher rpm. Induction noise is increased. A downside is that the location of the filter could potentially hydrolock the engine by pulling in water, as it is often located close to the ground. This is recommended for track or drag vehicles which keep the engine revs at higher rpm. (Engineering Explained: Cold Air Intakes Vs Short Ram Intakes)

Cold air intakes move the air filter outside of the engine compartment so that cooler air can be sucked into the engine for combustion. A cold air intake is installed outside the engine compartment, away from the heat created by the engine itself. (Why Should You Install a Cold Air Intake?)

Cold air vs ram air (Stinger's method unless you're running SSR): Difference Between Cold Air Intakes and Ram Air Intakes
 

Stiletto

Sustaining Member +
292
214
43
Virginia Beach, VA
Stiletto's definition is correct but maybe a bit too strict. I think any configuration that allows air from outside the engine bay a direct path to the air filter/intake without any warmer engine bay air mixing in can be sufficiently considered a 'cold' air intake as well. It's preferable to have as much of the intake hardware outside the engine bay as possible, but in most vehicle this is not logistically / cosmetically practical. IMO anything that allows cold air into the engine without the engine air being allowed into that intake is CAI. Most people are using cone shaped "performance air intakes", not COLD air intakes, since the entire intake sites in the engine bay and is sending warm air into the engine (versus cooler air direct from outside the engine bay). But they commonly call all intakes "cold" air. It's a misnomer.
Yes, I'm a stickler for proper technical application. 20 years of a technical job in the Navy has this effect.
 

StingerMG

Active Member
300
173
43
South Carolina
That’s what I did, bought a 2nd set of filters, when the time comes it allows for a quick change over & then time to clean & dry that set ready to go when required.
Speaking of replacing and cleaning. That's what I'm doing currently.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20221222_144241.jpg
    IMG_20221222_144241.jpg
    165.1 KB · Views: 18

Devin

1000 Posts Club!
1,109
989
118
Seattle-ish
False. The definition of a cold air intake hasn't changed in over 40 years. The filter element MUST be external to the engine bay and in direct line of incoming ambient air.
It's in a separate compartment that draws in outside air. You're referencing a distinction without a difference.

Being direct in-line with incoming air is ram air.
______________________________
 
The best place to buy Kia Stinger modifications is at KDM Warehouse dot com! The official store of Kia Stinger dot com...

Stiletto

Sustaining Member +
292
214
43
Virginia Beach, VA
It's in a separate compartment. You're referencing a distinction without a difference.
Huh!? Every mass produced vehicle uses airboxes with some sort of ducting feeding ambient air to it/them. If these met the definition of a cold air intake, there would be no purpose to relocate the filter element to a point outside of the engine and in the direct line of ambient air. Alas, there ARE specifically designed intakes which move the filter to the most direct flow of ambient air. These are true cold air intakes, not "a distinction without a difference".

Reference my several articles above if you don't believe me.
 

Devin

1000 Posts Club!
1,109
989
118
Seattle-ish
Huh!? Every mass produced vehicle uses airboxes with some sort of ducting feeding ambient air to it/them. If these met the definition of a cold air intake, there would be no purpose to relocate the filter element to a point outside of the engine and in the direct line of ambient air. Alas, there ARE specifically designed intakes which move the filter to the most direct flow of ambient air. These are true cold air intakes, not "a distinction without a difference".

Reference my several articles above if you don't believe me.
Yes, most production cars are made with cold air induction because drawing in engine compartment air is stupid.

Once again you are conflating cold air with ram air, which must use outside air. Is there another place for cold air on a car to come from?
 
Last edited:

Devin

1000 Posts Club!
1,109
989
118
Seattle-ish
Come to think of it, having the filter element outside of the engine, so not being directed through a plenum, would probably negate any venturi-type effect to increase velocity. I'm not a fluid mechanics engineer but your definition of cold air intake sounds like the only benefit is wet filters.
 

bfglitch

Stinger Enthusiast
CAI: For overall performance, this is the best option when the engine is revved to higher rpm. Induction noise is increased. A downside is that the location of the filter could potentially hydrolock the engine by pulling in water, as it is often located close to the ground. This is recommended for track or drag vehicles which keep the engine revs at higher rpm. (Engineering Explained: Cold Air Intakes Vs Short Ram Intakes)

Cold air intakes move the air filter outside of the engine compartment so that cooler air can be sucked into the engine for combustion. A cold air intake is installed outside the engine compartment, away from the heat created by the engine itself. (Why Should You Install a Cold Air Intake?)

Cold air vs ram air (Stinger's method unless you're running SSR): Difference Between Cold Air Intakes and Ram Air Intakes
From the First link: "Cold air intakes (CAI) look to increase power by moving the location which the engine pulls in air from inside the engine bay, to outside the engine bay. Many vehicles do this already, so you can see why it may seem a bit silly to shell out some money on this upgrade."

Says nothing about the filters must placed at the beginning of the air flow from outside the engine compartment. In fact it even says many vehicles already do this....which the Stinger technically does stock.

From your second link, since you didn't continue the copy/paste "The filters are usually moved to the upper wheel well area or near a fender where there is more access to free-flowing, cooler air and less hot air from the engine. Since hot air from the engine will rise, the lower placement also captures the coolest, densest air possible."

I have yet to see a car where the upper wheel well area is outside of the engine compartment, so from this example, the K&N, AEM etc are considered cold air intakes.

As for the third link, it's kinda conflicting, but in the case of the cold air intake description, it never says the filters must be placed outside the engine compartment to be considered a cold air intake. But from that page, it sounded more like in the Ram air intake is what you're speaking of but it also never mentions the filter must be the very first thing in the air stream
 
Looking to cover or replace the KIA emblems on your Stinger? Look no further than right here in our own forum store - where orders are shipped immediately!

Daniel @ K8 Stinger Store

Authorized Vendor
1,132
326
88
I personally love my Injen Intakes. I more or less bought them for the sound but from my experience, they really help once you are ready for a tune. More airflow seems to be more impactful once you throw on something like a JB4. Even if it did not provide performance (which it does), it provides a heck of a lot of smiles which is worth every penny spent.
 
The best place to buy Kia Stinger modifications is at KDM Warehouse dot com! The official store of Kia Stinger dot com...

Stiletto

Sustaining Member +
292
214
43
Virginia Beach, VA
Yes, most production cars are made with cold air induction because drawing in engine compartment air is stupid.

Once again you are conflating cold air with ram air, which must use outside air. Is there another place for cold air on a car to come from?
Come to think of it, having the filter element outside of the engine, so not being directed through a plenum, would probably negate any venturi-type effect to increase velocity. I'm not a fluid mechanics engineer but your definition of cold air intake sounds like the only benefit is wet filters.
Drawing in more air, even if it's warm, results in an increase of power. Thus, aftermarket warm air intakes that reduce turbulence and increase volume are a net positive...not stupid.

Seems you are confused about "ram" air. That technology has been around for almost 75 years. The air must be rammed into the intake, not just drawn in by the vacuum of the engine.

New to fuel injection, are we?? Venturi effect does not take place on non-carbureted engines.
______________________________
 

Stiletto

Sustaining Member +
292
214
43
Virginia Beach, VA
From the First link: "Cold air intakes (CAI) look to increase power by moving the location which the engine pulls in air from inside the engine bay, to outside the engine bay. Many vehicles do this already, so you can see why it may seem a bit silly to shell out some money on this upgrade."

Says nothing about the filters must placed at the beginning of the air flow from outside the engine compartment. In fact it even says many vehicles already do this....which the Stinger technically does stock.

From your second link, since you didn't continue the copy/paste "The filters are usually moved to the upper wheel well area or near a fender where there is more access to free-flowing, cooler air and less hot air from the engine. Since hot air from the engine will rise, the lower placement also captures the coolest, densest air possible."

I have yet to see a car where the upper wheel well area is outside of the engine compartment, so from this example, the K&N, AEM etc are considered cold air intakes.

As for the third link, it's kinda conflicting, but in the case of the cold air intake description, it never says the filters must be placed outside the engine compartment to be considered a cold air intake. But from that page, it sounded more like in the Ram air intake is what you're speaking of but it also never mentions the filter must be the very first thing in the air stream
So, there's a contradiction in that first article. Thanks.

Second point: None of the Stinger intakes are in the wheel well, so the K&N/AEM isn't true CAI. If you've owned an older Subaru or VW Golf/Jetta, you would know they have room in the fender/wheel well for their aftermarket CAIs.

Third article was to demonstrate the fact that the OEM design is more ram air than cold air.

Here's a description from AEM, a company that would know the definition of CAI:
"A cold air intake system relocates the filter outside of the engine compartment to deliver cool air inlet temperatures." (Cold Air Intakes | AEM)

From Stillen: "The cold air intake moves the filter location towards the front of the car to remove heat for cooler air flow into the throttle body." (INTAKE)

While many articles don't explicitly explain the difference between CAI and SRI/WAI, Cobb Tuning does a pretty good job:

Another site (if you trust it): Short Ram vs Cold Air Intake Differences: Which Is Better? | Low Offset

Yet another CAI vs SRI/WAI: Cold Air Intake vs Short Ram Intake – Which is better?
 

bfglitch

Stinger Enthusiast
So, there's a contradiction in that first article. Thanks.

Second point: None of the Stinger intakes are in the wheel well, so the K&N/AEM isn't true CAI. If you've owned an older Subaru or VW Golf/Jetta, you would know they have room in the fender/wheel well for their aftermarket CAIs.

Third article was to demonstrate the fact that the OEM design is more ram air than cold air.

Here's a description from AEM, a company that would know the definition of CAI:
"A cold air intake system relocates the filter outside of the engine compartment to deliver cool air inlet temperatures." (Cold Air Intakes | AEM)

From Stillen: "The cold air intake moves the filter location towards the front of the car to remove heat for cooler air flow into the throttle body." (INTAKE)

While many articles don't explicitly explain the difference between CAI and SRI/WAI, Cobb Tuning does a pretty good job:

Another site (if you trust it): Short Ram vs Cold Air Intake Differences: Which Is Better? | Low Offset

Yet another CAI vs SRI/WAI: Cold Air Intake vs Short Ram Intake – Which is better?
Thank you. Those are definitely much more informative and more useful at explaining the difference between them. And yeah I think I know what you mean when you mention the fender/wheel well room where the CAI goes. If I recall there's relatively decent sized empty space between the outer body sheet metal and the sheet metal that makes up the engine bay near the fender/wheel well of some vehicles.
 

ChaneRZ

1000 Posts Club!
1,822
1,177
118
Bay Area, California
In my Prelude/Integra days, there were two types of intakes… short ram and cold air intake. The cold air was located by the wheel well. You could install a bypass valve too to prevent hydrolocking the engine. I consider the Stinger’s CAI a short ram.
 
The best place to buy Kia Stinger modifications is at KDM Warehouse dot com! The official store of Kia Stinger dot com...
Top