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Decision on 'snow' tires

Discussion in 'Suspension, Brakes, Wheels, Tires Discussion' started by Ulikefishsticks, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Ulikefishsticks

    Ulikefishsticks United States Member

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    So I have had my 2018 stinger for over 2 months now. I live in North Carolina where the winters are quite non-existent but we do get ice. My family lives in update NY where they get a lot of snow and I usually visit around thanksgiving/Christmas time. I currently have the OEM staggered 19" wheels with the summers. I am looking for some opinions on what I should start with for tires that will be put ont the 19's I have right now. I do want to have a winter set and a summer set eventually just don't have the deep pockets for it around this time of year with it being a lot of traveling and gifts. I will probably keep the OEM wheels for winter and get the powder coated black.

    Is there a tire that I could get that has great ice grip, adequate snow grip and won't be ate up if I drive it in dry conditions for extended periods? I have seen the Michelin X-ice but I couldn't find any on tire rack that would fit the OEM 19's that come with the car.

    Thanks
     
  2. westcoastGT

    westcoastGT 5000 Posts Club!

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    Tire Rack has an excellent website , enter your car spec and see what they reco ,
     
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  3. HoneyBeeStinger

    HoneyBeeStinger United States New Member

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    They have Pirelli Winter Sottozero 3s that will fit stock staggered setup.
     
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  4. HerbieTheCar

    HerbieTheCar United States Active Member

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    AFAIK snow tires have better traction when they are narrower and are relatively cheaper compared to 19" 225/40R19 tires. I got my Blizzak WS80s for $143 each whereas according to Tire Rack, Blizzak LM-32 (225/40R19 93V XL) is $268.98 each. However, these tires are made for snow and below zero temperatures so it really depends on how many times you're going to go up to NY. Snow tires perform best around 32-40 Degrees Fahrenheit or below otherwise you'd be just peeling the treads off them.

    I also would not recommend just slapping winter tires on your OEM wheels because they will get destroyed by the salt and you probably won't have too many options when trying to find tires that fit over them.

    I'd recommend just buying a set of cheap but good looking steel/aluminum wheels and 18" winter tires. My whole set (tires and wheels) was about $1,300 including the TPMS ($1,100 without the TPMS) and it'll last me a few seasons.

    Or you can get UHP A/S tires which will do better than the OEM hockey pucks in the winter, but just know that they will not have as much traction as winter tires (went through a few winters in A/S tires).
     
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  5. GTA Jay

    GTA Jay Canada Active Member

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    I use Nokian Hakapilita’s on my OEM 19’s and they perform exceptionally well.
     
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  6. TwiceStung

    TwiceStung United States Active Member

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    I also live in NC.....near Asheville. In-laws also live in upstate NY. I haven’t driven the Stinger there, but around the mountains of NC, Nokian WRG4’s are more than enough for my RWD. You can also run them year round if you want since they are all weather, not all season.
     
  7. Ulikefishsticks

    Ulikefishsticks United States Member

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    I do enjoy the grip that summers provide in dry and wet conditions though. I really want 2 sets of tires, Winter set and a summer set. I didn't mention before but I do have the AWD stinger so that might help out dramatically with grip and control in the winter. The thing I worry most about is not driving fast through snow but being able to stop on ice.

    I think i'm going to actually go with this method and buy a set of 18" wheels and get some tires. The rubber is not as expensive too and the extra tire depth will provide cushion for the terrible roads in upstate NY.
     
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  8. MerlintheMad

    MerlintheMad United States 5000 Posts Club!

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    I think that given where you live, A/S are the most economical answer, since outlay of cash is a definite limitation for you. A/S will handle anything the Lower Forty-Eight have to dish out. The A/S UHP tire (like the Nitto Motivo I run in the winter) is the best all around performer in the winter where you live: it almost never freezes, and even then it is not days on end, resulting in frozen pavement. When the weather rises above freezing every day, and then snaps down to freezing day and night for a couple of days, the road surface remains warmer than the air because of the residual heat buildup over those many days above freezing. NC is not a place where you can even use a winter tire setup without stressing the compound in non winter conditions too often to make winter tires economically viable. Here, in Utah, we have cold weather where the day time temperatures don't get above freezing, sure we do: but those periods are brief (except in the most rare, extreme circumstances: I am speaking about driving in the valleys, not the upper elevations): and typically our roads are clear and dry well over 90% of the time; with daytime temps rising above freezing, even typically into the 40s for days or weeks on end. We get a few to half a dozen significant snow drops. Clearly, the winter tire shines at those times. The rest of the time, the 90%, the A/S tire outperforms the winter tire around here. In NC, winter is not even half what it is here. So the A/S makes even more sense for you.

    Stopping on ice isn't a consideration, since a snow tire won't save you if the first instant you're aware that you're on ice is when the skid with locked wheels starts. Oh, you might stop in twenty feet while an A/S will take less than twice that: if we're talking really slow, cautious speeds. If you're maintaining distances, either stopping distance should be enough. But if you're at highway speeds and hit black ice, just pray: no tire is going to swing the difference and save you: when that happens you're just a witless passenger.

    When you get to Up State NY, if it is winter, the weather is going to be your first clue. Temperatures below freezing are not going to affect an A/S dramatically. Snow on the road means slow down, establish extra distance. If you did have a winter tire, you might get a false sense of security. I would drive the same on both tires.

    If you did the drive on your Michelin summer tires, you wouldn't be in really dicey gription circumstances on a dry road until the temperatures dropped below c. 20F. Below c. 40F summer tires start to degrade in gription, true: but you just drive with more reserve, as if the tires are not expected to perform up to their intended potential: which is the truth. In the event that snow/slush/ice is on the road, you would crawl if you know what's required of you. And curse your luck! And hope to get out of it as soon as possible, however possible. Hard Michelin summer tires are a catastrophe waiting to happen. I have driven on mine at c. 32F more than once (just yesterday, in fact), at highway speeds, on mountain curves, on wet pavement even running to slush, and had no issues. But the tires were already warmed up when I got to those elevations and conditions, and I didn't push them. You just have to appreciate your limitations and stay well within them.
     
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  9. Buzz

    Buzz United States Member

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    Yeah, stick to good all seasons with an economical treadwear rating, you will get use of of them for 3-4 months in NC when the morning temps are below freezing, use if you go to Asheville all winter, and they will keep you from dying or getting stuck in NY.

    Just don't drive like an idiot or try to ford completely unplowed roads, because a low clearance RWD is going to suck at that regardless, and AS suck compared to dedicated winter tires in that dept.

    (From Wisconsin live in NC)
     
  10. TwiceStung

    TwiceStung United States Active Member

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  11. TwiceStung

    TwiceStung United States Active Member

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    Me too. Meaning we lived in WI before moving to NC (Hendersonville).

    Putting the Nokians back on Monday since we are supposed to be below 20F next week here. I will do my official review of the FEYNLAB tire “ceramic coating“ I used about 8 months ago at that point.
     
  12. Fredman

    Fredman United States Member

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    Just had my baby out in the snow for the first time. I was very impressed with general traction running only all season tires. Ability to start from dead stop and general controllability seemed very good. Then I got cocky. Turned off traction control and lightly blipped throttle on a gentle turn. Definitely an OMG moment. I swear I only brushed off some snow hanging from the bumper...
    I had to go back and take a picture of the tracks because I couldn’t believe how close it was. I was bracing for the impact. Thank God the backend of these cars taper in or I think I would be very depressed right now.
    Note to self and whomever else is reading, these cars
    “slide out” in a heartbeat -
    Especially with traction control off. :eek: going to go change my shorts now
     

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    Last edited: Nov 13, 2019 at 3:18 PM
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