kia stinger store

Correcting water spots on PPF & recommended Orbital polishers

Ulikefishsticks

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So my front end has PPF and the hood is covered in water spots. I bought the car used and it already had water spots on the PPF. It's not bad but it's noticeable in the right light. Now I have read that you can use a polisher on PFF but of course having to be careful and start light and work your way up until you get results with different pads/compounds. Has anyone had any experience with water spot removal from PPF? Maybe a method with an polisher?

Which brings me to my next question. I have been looking to buy a polisher for a few months. I want to have it before the end of "winter" here where I live which is a couple months. I was at Harbor Freight and I did see a few but reviews were hit or miss. Any recommendations for a polisher? Thanks.
 

MerlintheMad

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Water spots on PPF? I never heard. But I guess it figures; if hard water spots paint/chrome/glass, it'll spot plastic. There have to be products specifically invented to remove water spots. But I'd try elbow grease with regular cleaners first. The idea of an orbital on PPF somehow seems wrong to me; scary, even.
 

Ulikefishsticks

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Yeah, I was weary about even attempting it. Maybe I could try using a pad with compound and just as you say, elbow grease. I just had a picture in my head of the polisher grabbing and ripping off the PPF. I have read if you do use a polisher to just work slowly and not to much in one spot as you could overheat the PPF.
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MerlintheMad

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Yeah, I was weary about even attempting it. Maybe I could try using a pad with compound and just as you say, elbow grease. I just had a picture in my head of the polisher grabbing and ripping off the PPF. I have read if you do use a polisher to just work slowly and not to much in one spot as you could overheat the PPF.

Then that would do it for me: no way. The quest for the right cleaner (spot remover) would be ON. I'd use microfiber by hand. First attempt would be ONR ONR And Stubborn Water Spots If the spots remained stubborn, I'd mix ONR with double the concentrate. I always wear rubber work gloves when washing my car; so I could stand the hottest water that a water heater puts out. :p
 

Ulikefishsticks

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I have attempted microfiber with a cleaner and that didn't do much, I have yet to try hot water with any cleaner. I'll give that a try. Thanks for the tips.
 

RedCal

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I would try this
Water spots are dissolved minerals, hot water has more dissolved minerals than cold, it might help dissolve the ones you have, but may create more as well, so I would follow the wash up with a detailer or something designed to eliminate water spots
 

Ulikefishsticks

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I am maybe wrong about them even being water spots, It could honestly be etching which is damage to the PPF right?
 

RedCal

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It's possible. ... but I would guess unlikely, water spots is the most likely answer, PPF can be "healed " to a certain extent with warm water to put some stretch back into it temporarily. If you hand wash in your driveway if might be worth having your water tested, but a look in your kettle will be a pretty good guide, if it is full of calcium and other white deposits you can bet it's water spots
 

Buzzrush

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Now...OBVIOUSLY I'm NOT suggesting you do this with your PPF, but I want to share this info in case someone else encounters this same problem. A few months back I had water spots on my black vinyl roof wrap that I couldn't get rid of no matter what I tried. I brought the Stinger to the place that installed the wrap and they worked on it for about an hour. They were completely baffled. Nothing worked. The shop manager called 3M for some direction and the guy told him to QUICKLY pass a BLOWTORCH :eek: over the spots and they should disappear. Sure enough, a few quick passes with the torch held 6 inches away and the spots vanished. I watched them do it and it was pretty crazy how they just faded away. Pretty cool...and nerve racking.
Have you tried this stuff? It works wonders for me when removing stubborn spots from the paint on my car. Westcoast recommended it and it's now my Go To for just about everything exterior.
1610496542493.png
 

RedCal

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Torching the wrap would be heat healing. .. but yes, I would never have the stomach to do it myself. .. hot water or heat gun maybe
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SoCalSHO

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Why don't you head to a shop that installs PPF and ask them what they think? Let us know what they say.
 

westcoastGT

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Now...OBVIOUSLY I'm NOT suggesting you do this with your PPF, but I want to share this info in case someone else encounters this same problem. A few months back I had water spots on my black vinyl roof wrap that I couldn't get rid of no matter what I tried. I brought the Stinger to the place that installed the wrap and they worked on it for about an hour. They were completely baffled. Nothing worked. The shop manager called 3M for some direction and the guy told him to QUICKLY pass a BLOWTORCH :eek: over the spots and they should disappear. Sure enough, a few quick passes with the torch held 6 inches away and the spots vanished. I watched them do it and it was pretty crazy how they just faded away. Pretty cool...and nerve racking.
Have you tried this stuff? It works wonders for me when removing stubborn spots from the paint on my car. Westcoast recommended it and it's now my Go To for just about everything exterior.
View attachment 54018
this is the Stuff !!!
 

NS_Stinger

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I have a Porter Cable random orbital polisher and love it, super high quality and works great. I did an entire paint correction on a black TSX I used to have and it worked great.

Random orbital polishers are a better option for detailing beginners as they reduce the risk of burning your paint by having your polisher in the same spot for too long.
 
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